Green Tea and Dehydration
Better than Water?

Scientists dispel myth about green tea and dehydration.



Public health nutritionist Dr. Carrie Ruxton and her colleagues at Kings College London said tea is healthier than pure water.

"Drinking tea is actually better for you than drinking water. Water is essentially replacing fluid. Tea replaces fluids and contains antioxidants so it's got two things going for it", said Dr. Ruxton

They dispelled the common belief that tea dehydrates. Tea not only rehydrates as well as water does, it also has many other health benefits.

"Studies on caffeine have found very high doses dehydrate and everyone assumes that caffeine-containing beverages dehydrate. But even if you had a really, really strong cup of tea or coffee, which is quite hard to make, you would still have a net gain of fluid."

"Also, a cup of tea contains fluoride, which is good for the teeth," she added.

"Studies in the laboratory have shown potential health benefits", said Claire Williamson of the British Nutrition Foundation.

"The evidence in humans is not as strong and more studies need to be done. But there are definite potential health benefits from the polyphenols in terms of reducing the risk of diseases such as heart disease and cancers.

"In terms of fluid intake, we recommend 1.5-2 litres per day and that can include tea. Tea is not dehydrating. It is a healthy drink."

This study was published in the Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2006.

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